movie

Character Critiques… True as They Can be… Beauty and the Beast-1991

Warning: Contains Spoilers***

The animated version of “Beauty and the Beast” remains one of my favorite Disney movies. I liked the live-action remake equally to the cartoon.

However, this post will only critique the characters in the 1991 cartoon. I will discuss all the major and minor characters (including the 3 silly girls in love with Gaston).

1: The Beast:

We all know how and why he became a beast and what he had to do to turn back into a human. His struggle to show kindness communicated well. He had trouble smiling and showing manners. He needed assistance from his servants.

When he grew and changed into a kinder entity, though, there was not much that either hinted at his change or did it gradually. It was a little too abrupt or sudden for plot convenience. The only hint is when he saved Belle after she ran away. However, I did like the beast more after he changed into a nicer character.

HIs anxiety right before the “Beauty and the Beast” song number felt real. I could easily relate to that since I often have to deal with anxiety.

2: Belle:

The provincial village girl who loves to read and is often misunderstood by her community was also well-developed. She was naïve and a little whiny at times, but also strong and brave. She refused to marry Gaston and longed for freedom and adventure. Her relationship to her horse, Philippe was adorable. She and her father’s bond also did well. And her attempt to love the beast was brilliant.

There is a conspiracy theory about Belle having Stockholm Syndrome, but I’m not sure if it’s true. Belle was a likable character.

When she entered the west wing, despite the Beast’s order to never go there, I appreciated how she resisted with Lumiere and Cogsworth, and checked out the area. I felt when she discovered the prince’s portrait before he’d turned into a beast, I felt that it was an important plot element. Had she gone there, would the ending have differed and would she have been confused?

3: Gaston:

The handsome man who wanted to marry Belle was also the main antagonist. Like the other villagers, he considered Belle’s father crazy and wouldn’t believe him about the beast until Belle revealed him to them. His sense of humor and sin was well balanced.

4: Lefou:

He was Gaston’s sidekick. He was silly, but also sinful. He tried to keep Gaston in a good mood. His character design was humorous and appropriate for his personality. Although when Gaston died, we never know what happened to Lefou after.

5: Maurice:

As the father of Belle, and un-liked by the village, Maurice is a great inventor. He also shows love and concern for his daughter. His fear at times was done well. I liked how he got excited over the props in the Beast’s castle (and didn’t know that they were once people). The moment he played with Cogsworth and called him an invention was hilarious.

Because he was unpopular, I often felt sorry for him. However, he was also a likable character.

6: Lumiere:

The kind servant who was turned into a candlestick was willing to take Maurice in, despite the Beast’s rules at the time. He was willing to give Belle dinner and the song, “Be Our Guest” was great.

I will say when he first greeted Belle, he went a little to far with the kissing. When he was mad that the beast let Belle go, his assumption that maybe it would’ve been better if Belle never came at all made him believable. Although, he seemed to have trouble remembering her name. Right before the “Beauty and the Beast” song number, he still called her, “the girl” instead of her name, “Belle”. Does Lumiere struggle to remember names of new people?

7: Cogsworth:

The clock servant had little sympathy when the beast was still nasty to outsiders. He disapproved of Maurice staying inside the castle because he was worried that the beast would find out, and then he did. When the beast changed into becoming nicer, so did Cogsworth.

8: Mrs. Potts:

One of the few female characters in this movie was turned into a tea-pot. She was kind like Lumiere. When she offered tea to Belle, that was sweet. The way she raised Chip was also great.

9: Chip:

He was Mrs. Potts’s son. He was so cute with Belle and was very brave. When he laughed at the beast’s bad eating manners, and Mrs. Potts gave him a dirty look, I must admit that I agreed with Chip. I appreciated how he helped Belle and Maurice escape from being sent to the asylum.

10: The 3 silly girls:

The blonde triplets who were in love with Gaston were funny. However, someone in a YouTube video pointed out that they didn’t do much to enhance the story. I couldn’t help but agree with them. However, their actions still amused me.

 

Do you want to mention anything you like about these characters?

movie

Behold… It’s “Evan Almighty”-2007 Movie Review

Warning: Contains spoilers***

 

Steve Carrell has had amazing roles in some great movies. He has acted in “The 40-year-old Virgin” and “Sleepover”. He has also starred in this movie, “Evan Almighty.”

The movie centers on a man named Evan and his family, who move to D.C. He gets a job at a government office when animals start coming toward him. God (Morgan Freeman) informs Evan about the flood and how he has to build an ark. As the story progresses, Evan’s appearance changes into the biblical Noah’s look, with the long white hair and beard. No one listens to Evan when the flood happens. But the ark saves everyone when the flood does occur.

I enjoyed this film, and how Evan constantly went through a lot. The scene where his clothes and beard ties change and he is kicked out of the room made me feel sorry for him. It must have been embarrassing.

The stray dog was also humorous. The youngest son pulled a stick out of its mouth and the dog eventually became the family pet.

The ending wrapped the story up just nicely enough. Although Evan had lost his job, I found it satisfying that he got his old look back.

The biblical references were also done well and were clearly thought out, such as the number and the legend of Noah and his ark.

Overall, I would rate this film 4 out of 5 stars. Some scenes could have been better at engaging me. But the story and humor was successful.

TV show

Codename: Kids Next Door: Operation A.N.A.L.Y.S.I.S

Warning: Contains spoilers***

 

The Cartoon Network program, Codename: Kids Next Door, premiered in 2002, when I started fourth grade. It consisted of 5 children who lived in a huge treehouse (there were other KND homes, as well) who would go on missions and fight against adults. I would recommend knowing, at least, the main and major characters before reading further.

The show ended in 2008. However, there was (and may still be) a petition going on for a reboot. The show had a lot of great moments, but also a lot of not-so-great moments. I will share my favorite moments first.

The episodes with the baby man running a TV production and the one after where Numbuhs 2 and 3 adopt a baby skunk, were probably my favorite ones. The baby man set off something where he would turn everyone in the world into babies so that nobody would call him a baby. I liked when the thing the baby man used turned a chair into a high chair. That was clever. The plot of saving a camp and Numbuhs 2 and 3 raising a baby skunk was amazing. The skunk would sound like a human baby.

The idea of rainbow monkeys was just silly and amusing. There was even a theme song for them, as well as an island.

The 5 main characters had great development and traits. Their rooms represented their personalities well (Numbuh 3’s room had big stuffed animals—one that she slept on), as did their physical appearances.

Now the TV show is not without its flaws. Sometimes, things would show up just for plot convenience. However, one of the pitfalls I just can’t agree with was constant disrespect and hatred toward those 13 and over because they were not kids (although in reality, you’re a kid until the age of 18, but you might not consider 13 to 17-year-olds little kids). I get that the KND didn’t like having to deal with authority or being bossed around. Still—is this really something you think kids should be learning? I guess it’s okay as long as they don’t imitate it themselves and respect the boundaries between what’s acceptable in cartoons, but not in real life.

One thing I was surprised by was that, at some point during the show, the creators decided to show the KND’s parents’ faces, except for Numbuh 5’s. Why did they change their minds? Why did they decide to continue to hide Numbuh 5’s parents’ faces, but show everyone else’s?

Also, the rainbow monkeys, as live-creatures, kind of looked the opposite of cute. Sharp teeth and drooling is not exactly the most appealing to me. The idea of how they changed colors, though, was cool.

So those are my thoughts of the TV show. Of course, no cartoon is perfect. But many have a lot of benefits and great ways to communicate humor. Codename: Kids Next Door is among many of them.