fiction

Harry Potter Mystery: Why Don’t We Hear About Wizards with Disabilities?

While J.K. Rowling has addressed and revealed different elements of the “Harry Potter” franchise, including sexual orientations (Dumbledore was gay), there are topics she discussed little to nothing on. Those include vampires, because she claims they’re cliched, religion, even though she mentioned that there were Jewish wizards, such as Anthony Goldstein, and what this post is about: disabilities. Disabilities are never mentioned in “Harry Potter”, except for a blind wizard that didn’t make it to the books and the possibility of Professor McGonagall being in a wheelchair temporarily. But we never hear about wizards and witches who are deaf, mute, or have other physical or neurological disabilities. There have been no clues to special ed at Hogwarts or handicapped pathways or restrooms in the wizarding world.

Although there have not been big discussions about this from major sources, I’m not the first to notice the lack of possible neurodiversity in the “Harry Potter” series. For instance, I saw a comment on YouTube where someone said that they wanted to ask J.K. Rowling if there were autistic wizards, but they couldn’t find a way to contact her. I was thinking, I don’t know. Maybe. We do know there are Jewish, gay, and Transgender wizards. Another person asked on Quora if Hermione had Asperger’s (which I highly doubt), and another YouTuber came up with a theory that Newt Scamander from the spinoff “Fantastic Beasts” franchise had Autism (which I also think is highly unlikely as he didn’t seem that way to me).

Speaking of theories, I have come up with a guess on why neurodiversity is never discussed in “Harry Potter”. Maybe when J.K. Rowling was planning the series in the 90’s, she might not have thought about disabilities at the time. Think about it—the only option for magical education in her books’ world is going to the designated boarding schools. If a child doesn’t learn to control his or her wizardry and suppresses it, he or she becomes an obscurial, where he or she turns into smoke. In fact, many obscurial children don’t live past age 10.

I don’t know the real reason why Rowling never address disabilities in the wizarding world, but the only guesses I have are best to be avoided here. Have you noticed this detail as well?

fiction

Fiona: A Flash Fiction Piece

I didn’t mean to hurt her. I should have known that this other girl had a disability. I realized that some people with disabilities did not respond well to yelling.

            The girl’s name was Fiona. Fiona had interrupted me with some thought going on inside her head while I’d talked to my friend, Juliette. She’d spoken about something that happened at a game she’d seen. She’d done it over and over again until I snapped at her, saying, “Fiona, stop it! You’re being so freaking annoying! Go away!”

            And right that second, Fiona had burst into tears. Another kid had said that Fiona had some disability. I had flushed after.

            I now sat at my desk and did my homework. For health class, we had to research a disability. I was assigned Asperger’s Syndrome.

            As I pulled up the Internet on my computer, I received a text message. It came from Juliette.

            Hey Mandy

            Fiona just told me she was diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome over the weekend. She was too afraid to tell you.

            I opened my mouth. I had not yet researched the symptoms of Asperger’s Syndrome. But maybe that explained why she had had trouble with understanding my feelings. Why she had been desperate to get her thoughts out. Why she had cried when I’d yelled at her.

            When I did the research, I saw that people with Asperger’s can be eager to let their thoughts out as well as emotionally sensitive.

            After finishing my homework, I texted Juliette back.

            Tell Fiona I am sorry for yelling at her. Thanks.

            I sent the message. Hopefully, Fiona would forgive me.

movie

Alice in Wonderland Theory: Does Alice Have Autism?

Warning: contains spoilers***

I have watched Alice in Wonderland (the 1951 cartoon) several months ago. While I have enjoyed it, I noticed that Alice had traits that were similar to certain people who have Autism (not everyone).

Yes, the whole Wonderland trip turned out to be a dream the whole time. But some of Alice’s actions and lines during the story, I felt, seemed different than some kids her age.

Of course, no one will ever know the answer to, whether or not, Alice has Autism (and either hasn’t been diagnosed with it or is forced to keep it secret from everyone). Even the Disney company itself might not know. But here are some traits I’ve noticed on Alice that made me come up with this conspiracy theory.

***Update***

This theory has been shut down. However, don’t let that discourage you from reading. The messages about accepting yourself as you are and the events in “Alice in Wonderland” are still true.

1: Being very sensitive and naive

Of course, anyone can be like this. And that can be a good thing, too. But it seemed that for Alice, it was stronger. However, that is just a minor part, and Alice still remains pretty brave.

2: Having an impulse to follow the white rabbit, just because she was curious to know where he was going

Not many children Alice’s age would do that. But often times, being curious can lead to learning more and growing smarter.

3: Repeating phrases, like, “I beg your pardon”

This could have been just from the script writer. After all, no one’s perfect. So it is possible that the screenwriter for “Alice in Wonderland” didn’t realize that he/she made Alice say, “I beg your pardon” a lot. But I do see this trait with some people on the spectrum. Still, they remain very intelligent people, regardless.

4: Having to be reminded or taught social rules

Tweedle-dee and Tweedle-dum had to remind Alice proper greetings. The jack rabbit and the mad-hatter had to teach her that it was rude to join others without being invited. But once again, everyone makes mistakes. Alice is not stupid. She just needed to learn.

In spite of these traits, Alice is still a likable character. Whether she has Autism or not, she is smart and well-behaved.

Everyone is great the way they are. It’s important to be proud the way you are. Don’t worry about weaknesses. Focus on your strengths.