TV show

Wish Granted! It’s My Top Favorite Episodes of “The Fairly Odd Parents”

From ages 7 – 12, I was a huge fan of “The Fairly Odd Parents”. I noticed tons of details, changes (including some inconsistencies), and much more. I would go out of my way to watch a FOP special. For example, when “Fairy Idol” premiered, I wanted to be home in time to watch it.

While I enjoyed the show very much, I have some favorite episodes. I will select the top 5.

 

5: “Emotion Commotion”

 

Timmy is afraid to go off the high-dive at a pool, despite his crush, Trixie and the other popular kids watching. He screams as he goes off, and his bathing suit comes off. He is laughed at because he’s naked. At home, he wishes to have no emotions. Kids continue to crack up after he was nude at the pool. Adults make Timmy face dangerous challenges because he has no emotions.

I was amazed at how imaginative the creators were with what it would be like to have no emotions. Timmy ended up dull all the time. When asked, “How do you feel?”, he’d answer with “I don’t.” What an interesting concept.

 

4: “Babyface”

 

Timmy is sent to hang with the big kids at Flappy Bob’s Learnatorium. When the kids chase Timmy, he ends up in the daycare center. In order to hide, he wishes to become a baby. Everything works, until Timmy discovers that he can’t talk anymore. He has to find another way to wish himself back to being 10.

I found this episode to be quite funny, especially when a baby took off his own diaper and threw it at Francis. I enjoyed Happy-Peppy Gary and Betty’s moments in the swamp scene, when Gary said to sing a song about not getting eaten by alligators and Betty actually started until Gary said, “I was being Ironic.” I also realize that Timmy would’ve lost his ability to spell and read after wishing he was a baby. Kids learn to talk before they read and spell. But that’s a whole different topic. But hey—plot convenience matters to the creators.

 

3: “Mr. Right”

 

Following “Babyface”, Timmy is sick of getting everything wrong. He wishes that everything he said was right. From the US having 49 states to losing Cosmo and Wanda, things get out of hand.

I loved when Mr. Crocker presented “The Scream” to Timmy. Timmy asked why he was screaming. Mr. Crocker answered, “Because he got an F… like you.” He even showed more of the painting and the figure with an F in front of him. Oh my gosh. I could laugh all day at that, even though that’s not why the figure is screaming. I liked when Timmy said stuff to Francis to block his hearing so that he could get his fairies back.

 

2: “Yoo Doo”

 

Timmy wants revenge on Francis. Cosmo mentions Yoo Doo dolls. But Wanda doesn’t approve. Nevertheless, Timmy wishes for them. He succeeds at humiliating Francis, but things get out of control. While with Trixie, Tootie controls Timmy with his Yoo Doo doll and makes him talk about how great Tootie and how she’s better than Trixie.

This episode made me laugh a lot. I enjoyed when people were being controlled by others using their Yoo Doo dolls. Yes, this wouldn’t be funny in real life. But it’s a cartoon.

 

And now… drumroll

 

1: “Just Desserts”

 

Timmy is mad when he doesn’t get sweets for dessert. He got carrots, a textbook to multiply fractions with AJ’s family, and a broccoli and brussel sprout sundae with Mark. He wishes that everything was dessert. Cookies, cakes, ice cream, and more. Everyone gets hyper, but then becomes obese. People have to roll to get around. Then the weight of everybody puts pressure on the Earth and it rolls toward the sun (which, by the way, would NOT happen in real life).

This episode was, perhaps, my favorite. I cracked up through a lot of the episode. I particularly found Trixie popping her belt off to be humorous. The idea of everything being desserts was amazing.

 

So there you have it. Although “The Fairly Odd Parents” isn’t the same as it was when I was a child, I’ll always value it as one of my favorite childhood TV shows.

 

TV show

PowerPuff Girls Theory: Was Their US History Different from Ours?

Anyone who grew up in the 90’s or 00’s might have remembered a show on Cartoon Network called “The PowerPuff Girls”. I was especially a huge fan of that show in 2nd grade. But that’s another story.

Anyway, those who watched the show all know the premise. Professor Utunium mixed three ingredients (sugar, spice, and everything nice) and accidentally dropped chemical X, thus creating the PowerPuff girls, Blossom, Bubbles, and Buttercup. The girls fight crime and save Townsville.

When there’s trouble, the mayor contacts the PowerPuff girls through their special telephone. The girls fight the crime and throw the villains in jail. And… without a trial.

There was never a courthouse, judge, lawyers, defense attorneys, witnesses, or any of that in “The PowerPuff Girls”. Not once have villains such as Mojo-Jojo, Princess, Him, or anyone else been tried and found innocent or guilty. They’re just immediately thrown in jail by the PowerPuff girls.

Yes, it’s a cartoon. But because people get tried before getting locked up in real life, I wonder if their history differed from ours today.

I will not go into detail as I do not discuss politics on my blog. However, I still consider this quite interesting.

TV show

Lucky There’s a Family Guy… And its Funniest Moments

I discovered this cartoon when I was about 15. I fell in love with it. Yes, it’s pretty mature and has a lot of adult content. However, it’s also got amazing slapstick humor. I could laugh hysterically at it all day. These are my top five picks, though.

 

5: Asian Santa

Stewie remembers a moment where the mall had an Asian Santa Claus. It might’ve been a little stereotypical (but that’s normal in “Family Guy”), yet I couldn’t help but laugh. I’m Southeast-Asian myself (Indian).

 

4: Peter on Red bull

From when Peter starts re-enacting the “And I Feel Like I Just Got Home” music video to right before Lois is on the phone and he hangs up because he can’t find his red bull, I laugh at the moments. I especially liked when Peter impressed Chris, but Chris went on fire—literally.

 

3: Saggy Naggy

Oh my god—what a disrespectful thing anyone could do to his or her spouse (and probably get in trouble with the law for it in real life). Nevertheless, in the episode where Peter starts his own children’s TV show, he portrays Lois as a nagging and annoying puppet after he disliked her attitude toward him. When the kids beat up Lois at Costmart, that cracked me up.

 

2: Chris making a dead body pick his nose and eat it

Obviously, this would not be funny in real life. However, in the show, it cracked me up a lot. Meg worked in a funeral home with the bodies and Chris got excited. He even stole one to get him into R-rated movies.

 

And now… drumroll

 

1: Peter crying like Snoopy

I laugh so loud and hard that I will not allow myself to watch this outside home. That large mouth and position is absolutely hilarious.

 

While “Family Guy” has gone kind of far at times (some countries have even banned it), nothing was ever an issue for me. I still enjoy it and laugh at its moments now.

 

TV show

Wubba Lubba Dub-dub! “Rick and Morty” Episodes that Rule!

Warning: Contains spoilers***

 

Unlike many other TV shows, I never watched “Rick and Morty” on live television. I discovered certain moments through YouTube. I enjoyed them and decided to check out the episodes.

And here are my favorites…

 

2: The episode with Tiny Rick:

Rick switches bodies with a tinier version of himself to go back to high school. Meanwhile, Jerry and Beth work on sorting out their conflicts on another planet.

I loved when Tiny Rick went to the high school dance and made a dance of his own. I will admit when he gets expelled, the way it was communicated was too gentle. But it is a cartoon. When Morty yells at Summer to get her stuff (or technically, a four-letter word) together, that was done well.

 

1: The gazorpian episode.

 

Morty convinces Rick to by a robot, which Morty has a baby with. The baby grows up into something dangerous, despite Morty’s urge to teach him right from wrong. Meanwhile, Summer and Rick end up on Gazorpazorp, where Summer discovers it’s a place where women rule.

This episode is my favorite. I liked how Morty struggled to teach his son that what he wanted to do was bad and tried to distract him, but failed. I also wonder why gazorpians age from baby to adult in just a day. That would be the one question I would ask the “Rick and Morty” creators if I could.

 

So there you have it. I will admit that I didn’t watch as much of the series as I did with the ones I’ve viewed on live TV. But “Rick and Morty” still remains an entertaining show for me.

TV show

Ha, Ha, Ha… I’m Happy About the Funniest Moments of “The Simpsons”

The longest running animated TV show about the family of five is one of my favorites. That’s right, I’m talking about “The Simpsons”. I’ve been laughing at the moments for many years.

And that is what the post is all about. It will mention scenes from the traditional episodes, Treehouse of Horror episodes, and even the theatrical movie from 2007. Here’s the countdown.

 

5: In the Treehouse of Horror episode, “Time and Punishment”, Homer fixes the toaster and ends up turning it into a time traveling toaster. When he first goes back to the time of dinosaurs, he remembers the advice from his father on his wedding day. That was to never step on anything if traveling back in time, because even the smallest errors could drastically alter the future. But Homer accidentally squishes a bug. And when he questions how that can’t possibly change the future, a prehistoric mammal shrugs and makes a noise meaning, “I don’t know.” The last sentence was the funniest part.

 

4: In the animation festival episode, Homer volunteers to wear the special costume and have the animated dog follow every movement he made. Every move cracked me up. But when Homer used the bathroom in that costume, that was just hilarious.

 

3: In the theatrical release from 2007, Bart skateboarding naked was humorous from when he first started to when he landed on the window outside a burger place.

 

2: In the Treehouse of Horror episode, “Nightmare Cafeteria”, after so many students have been put in detention and never cane back, a kid shook out of anxiety at his desk and his pencil dropped. Mrs. Krabappel pointed at the door and said, “Detention.” I don’t know why, but that moment cracked me up a lot.

 

And onto the number 1 funniest moment…

 

1: In the Treehouse of Horror episode with the watch that stopped time, the scene where Homer tries to eat doughnuts and they all disappear. Then his clothes disappear, as do Nelson’s. I laugh so hard at that scene that I kind of lose my voice.

 

So there you have it—the funniest moments of “The Simpsons”.

 

movie

Character Critiques… True as They Can be… Beauty and the Beast-1991

Warning: Contains Spoilers***

The animated version of “Beauty and the Beast” remains one of my favorite Disney movies. I liked the live-action remake equally to the cartoon.

However, this post will only critique the characters in the 1991 cartoon. I will discuss all the major and minor characters (including the 3 silly girls in love with Gaston).

1: The Beast:

We all know how and why he became a beast and what he had to do to turn back into a human. His struggle to show kindness communicated well. He had trouble smiling and showing manners. He needed assistance from his servants.

When he grew and changed into a kinder entity, though, there was not much that either hinted at his change or did it gradually. It was a little too abrupt or sudden for plot convenience. The only hint is when he saved Belle after she ran away. However, I did like the beast more after he changed into a nicer character.

HIs anxiety right before the “Beauty and the Beast” song number felt real. I could easily relate to that since I often have to deal with anxiety.

2: Belle:

The provincial village girl who loves to read and is often misunderstood by her community was also well-developed. She was naïve and a little whiny at times, but also strong and brave. She refused to marry Gaston and longed for freedom and adventure. Her relationship to her horse, Philippe was adorable. She and her father’s bond also did well. And her attempt to love the beast was brilliant.

There is a conspiracy theory about Belle having Stockholm Syndrome, but I’m not sure if it’s true. Belle was a likable character.

When she entered the west wing, despite the Beast’s order to never go there, I appreciated how she resisted with Lumiere and Cogsworth, and checked out the area. I felt when she discovered the prince’s portrait before he’d turned into a beast, I felt that it was an important plot element. Had she gone there, would the ending have differed and would she have been confused?

3: Gaston:

The handsome man who wanted to marry Belle was also the main antagonist. Like the other villagers, he considered Belle’s father crazy and wouldn’t believe him about the beast until Belle revealed him to them. His sense of humor and sin was well balanced.

4: Lefou:

He was Gaston’s sidekick. He was silly, but also sinful. He tried to keep Gaston in a good mood. His character design was humorous and appropriate for his personality. Although when Gaston died, we never know what happened to Lefou after.

5: Maurice:

As the father of Belle, and un-liked by the village, Maurice is a great inventor. He also shows love and concern for his daughter. His fear at times was done well. I liked how he got excited over the props in the Beast’s castle (and didn’t know that they were once people). The moment he played with Cogsworth and called him an invention was hilarious.

Because he was unpopular, I often felt sorry for him. However, he was also a likable character.

6: Lumiere:

The kind servant who was turned into a candlestick was willing to take Maurice in, despite the Beast’s rules at the time. He was willing to give Belle dinner and the song, “Be Our Guest” was great.

I will say when he first greeted Belle, he went a little to far with the kissing. When he was mad that the beast let Belle go, his assumption that maybe it would’ve been better if Belle never came at all made him believable. Although, he seemed to have trouble remembering her name. Right before the “Beauty and the Beast” song number, he still called her, “the girl” instead of her name, “Belle”. Does Lumiere struggle to remember names of new people?

7: Cogsworth:

The clock servant had little sympathy when the beast was still nasty to outsiders. He disapproved of Maurice staying inside the castle because he was worried that the beast would find out, and then he did. When the beast changed into becoming nicer, so did Cogsworth.

8: Mrs. Potts:

One of the few female characters in this movie was turned into a tea-pot. She was kind like Lumiere. When she offered tea to Belle, that was sweet. The way she raised Chip was also great.

9: Chip:

He was Mrs. Potts’s son. He was so cute with Belle and was very brave. When he laughed at the beast’s bad eating manners, and Mrs. Potts gave him a dirty look, I must admit that I agreed with Chip. I appreciated how he helped Belle and Maurice escape from being sent to the asylum.

10: The 3 silly girls:

The blonde triplets who were in love with Gaston were funny. However, someone in a YouTube video pointed out that they didn’t do much to enhance the story. I couldn’t help but agree with them. However, their actions still amused me.

 

Do you want to mention anything you like about these characters?

TV show

Codename: Kids Next Door: Operation A.N.A.L.Y.S.I.S

Warning: Contains spoilers***

 

The Cartoon Network program, Codename: Kids Next Door, premiered in 2002, when I started fourth grade. It consisted of 5 children who lived in a huge treehouse (there were other KND homes, as well) who would go on missions and fight against adults. I would recommend knowing, at least, the main and major characters before reading further.

The show ended in 2008. However, there was (and may still be) a petition going on for a reboot. The show had a lot of great moments, but also a lot of not-so-great moments. I will share my favorite moments first.

The episodes with the baby man running a TV production and the one after where Numbuhs 2 and 3 adopt a baby skunk, were probably my favorite ones. The baby man set off something where he would turn everyone in the world into babies so that nobody would call him a baby. I liked when the thing the baby man used turned a chair into a high chair. That was clever. The plot of saving a camp and Numbuhs 2 and 3 raising a baby skunk was amazing. The skunk would sound like a human baby.

The idea of rainbow monkeys was just silly and amusing. There was even a theme song for them, as well as an island.

The 5 main characters had great development and traits. Their rooms represented their personalities well (Numbuh 3’s room had big stuffed animals—one that she slept on), as did their physical appearances.

Now the TV show is not without its flaws. Sometimes, things would show up just for plot convenience. However, one of the pitfalls I just can’t agree with was constant disrespect and hatred toward those 13 and over because they were not kids (although in reality, you’re a kid until the age of 18, but you might not consider 13 to 17-year-olds little kids). I get that the KND didn’t like having to deal with authority or being bossed around. Still—is this really something you think kids should be learning? I guess it’s okay as long as they don’t imitate it themselves and respect the boundaries between what’s acceptable in cartoons, but not in real life.

One thing I was surprised by was that, at some point during the show, the creators decided to show the KND’s parents’ faces, except for Numbuh 5’s. Why did they change their minds? Why did they decide to continue to hide Numbuh 5’s parents’ faces, but show everyone else’s?

Also, the rainbow monkeys, as live-creatures, kind of looked the opposite of cute. Sharp teeth and drooling is not exactly the most appealing to me. The idea of how they changed colors, though, was cool.

So those are my thoughts of the TV show. Of course, no cartoon is perfect. But many have a lot of benefits and great ways to communicate humor. Codename: Kids Next Door is among many of them.

movie

Feel “The Jungle Book” Rhythm: The 1967 and 2003 Cartoon Comparisons

Warning: Contains spoilers***

 

“The Jungle Book” was the first animated Disney feature since Walt Disney had died a year before in 1966. I did not watch recent live-action remake, so it will not be part of this comparison.

I actually saw the sequel from 2003 first. I didn’t see it in the movie theater, but I did watch it regularly after it came on DVD. The opening starts off with Mowgli using shadow puppets to narrate the story of the first movie. It then starts its own plot. Mowgli is forbidden to go into the jungle because his authority figures consider it dangerous. But Mowgli just misses the jungle. Baloo misses Mowgli and rebels against Bagheera’s demand to not take Mowgli back. After Mowgli is punished for leading the other children from the village to the jungle, Baloo finds him and takes Mowgli back into the jungle. However, Shere Khan is still out to hurt Mowgli.

I haven’t seen “The Jungle Book 2” in years. However, I did see the main feature from 1967. It gave me a better understanding of the sequel. As an infant, Mowgli is raised by wolves. Years later, Bagheera forces him into the village, but Mowgli keeps resisting and wants to stay in the jungle. He meets and befriends Baloo, gets kidnapped by monkeys but trusts them, runs away after Baloo tells him to go to the village, and faces the dangerous Shere Khan.

Now onto my opinions: I found the first film to be less engaging than the sequel. The sequel was more modernized and had a new cast of voices. I also appreciated how Shanti becomes a more major character and is not whiny or too reliable on males. Her name is not said when she is first introduced at the end of the first installment. She also has no speaking lines; just a song and a giggle. Despite how she becomes essential in the second movie, I felt that having her in the first movie was just a quick and cheap way to get Mowgli to go to the village. There were no hints to Shanti, except at the beginning credits with her voice actress’s name. But she was just referred to as “the girl.”

Also, in the main movie, why did Baloo deliberately fake his death, other than for plot convenience? It seems common for there to be sad moments before the happy endings in Disney movies. But rather than having someone save Baloo more believably, he just surprisingly turned out to be alive.

I still enjoyed the first film enough to rate it 4 out of 5 stars. However, I favor the sequel more, even though I haven’t seen it in several years. The film wrapped up more believably and there was no forced content just for plot convenience.

movie

“Paranorman” (2012): Must be the Time of the Critique

Warning: Contains spoilers***

 

I first discovered this film when my family watched it in the living room of our house. I didn’t see the whole thing until the second time on my own. However, I saw enough that it caught my interest.

“Paranorman” portrays a young boy, named Norman Babcock, who can talk to the dead. He is the only one who can see ghosts. However, others don’t understand him and they think he is crazy… except for a heavy kid named Neil, who gets excited by Norman’s special powers.

But Norman is given a task to stop a witch’s curse from raising the dead. He fails and the zombies go to town. The community tries to hurt the zombies until Norman understands them and discovers that they are not trying to hurt anybody.

I enjoyed the movie enough that I watched it over and over again on my own. In fact, “Paranorman” is one of the few movies I can watch a lot in a short period of time.

And now, what I admired about the film:

 

1: The humor

 

Despite the dark tone, the humor added was done well. I loved the scene of the guy waiting for his snack at the vending machine while the zombies come closer to him. The dialogue also expresses humor effectively. It’s especially funny in the second half of the film.

 

2: The plot twist revealing the “witch”

 

I appreciated the twist on how the “witch” was just a miserable little girl that nobody had understood and had been executed for “witchcraft”. That plays well into what people should be expected to know today. Obviously, there were never wicked witches who flew on broomsticks and cackled in real life. However, the accusation of people being witches throughout history and getting punished for it actually happened in history.

Of course, people have changed then and try to support those that others constantly miscomprehend. I adored how Norman tried to talk to the girl, called Agatha, to get her to stop the jinx. After the fight scene, the next one calmed down and showed Agatha’s true innocence.

 

3: The historical facts about Puritans

 

Although this is frowned upon in storytelling if overdone, just the right amount that the plot needs will make it work. In “Paranorman”, the facts about the Pilgrims and their culture engaged my interest in the film even more. I was reminded facts that I had almost forgotten myself, like when people found guilty of witchcraft were no longer considered humans.

 

Now onto the parts I believe could have been portrayed better:

 

1: Believability

 

Despite the humor in the plot and characterization, I found certain elements to be unbelievable. While that didn’t bother me much, I was surprised when I discovered that “Paranorman” was based off a book. Book rules are another story, but characters do have to behave like real people. Unless the movie changed pretty much everything from the book, I feel that the story and characters could have been more believable.

For example, Norman walks to school for minutes by himself, at age 11. If the story took place in the 70’s or earlier, then that would have been believable. However, it takes place around the time it was released. If you let your eleven-year-old child walk to school in a city alone, you could get in trouble with CPS.

Another example was when Salma barely reacted to Norman thinking that the zombies were about to eat him. She just sighed and answered his question about finding out where the witch was buried. Even if you didn’t care about your classmate, wouldn’t you be scared if he or she called you and told you about a zombie currently attacking him or her? I certainly would.

 

2: The character stereotypes

 

Norman’s mother is more gentle and shows more effort in understanding him than his father, who is rougher and refuses to comprehend what he goes through. His older sister, Courtney, gets annoyed with his actions, talks on the phone a lot, and talks with the stereotypical teenage girl language. Doesn’t anyone find these clichéd at this point?

 

3: The mildly mature content

 

I used to think “Paranorman” was rated PG-13 due to the language, mildly sexual terms, and dark tone. It is actually PG, like almost every children’s movie is these days. The others may have crude humor or mild language (not cursing, but words like “idiot”), but they are not usually like “Paranorman”. I don’t know if a child under 12 should watch “Paranorman” unless they are considered very mature for his or her age.

 

Overall, though, I would rate “Paranorman” 5 out of 5 stars. I still enjoyed it very much and hope to watch it again soon.

 

 

 

movie

Put Your Thoughts in What You Most Believe in… Review of “Tarzan” (1999)

Warning: Contains spoilers***

This is one of the few 2nd Disney Renaissance films I have watched in the movie theater due to my age now (24). I was five at the time I saw “Tarzan”. I don’t remember my opinion then.

However, I will tell you what I thought when I saw “Tarzan” twice in recent years. Although I liked it more seeing it the second time, this review is going to reflect my opinions on the film the first time I saw it recently.

We all know the story. As a baby, Tarzan gets stranded in the jungle with his parents. His mom and dad build a tree house, but die right after. A female gorilla named Kala, who has just lost her own young, takes Tarzan and raises him. Tarzan grows up wondering why he is different. He tries to fit in. When he reaches adulthood, he discovers humans and can relate to them better. A young woman named Jane falls in love with Tarzan. Tarzan is interested in her, as well. However, his interest to people becomes the feeling of betrayal to his animal pals. Tarzan has to make a tough decision.

While I would give the other Disney movies from the second Renaissance 5 stars, I would only give “Tarzan” 3.5 stars. Something about it wasn’t as engaging as the other Disney films from that era. I don’t know if it was because there isn’t much in the way of singing from the characters, except partly by Kala in the number, “You’ll Be In My Heart”, or some other mysterious element. It just didn’t hold my attention as much as the films from “The Little Mermaid” to “Mulan”.

However, some scenes engaged my emotions. For instance, when Tarzan puts clothes on to join the people, I almost thought he was ditching his animal friends, but also making the right choice. I also found Kerchak to be too unlikable until he died. He was too dark as an adoptive gorilla father. I understand that that’s an important element to the story and his character. But I feel like a gentle mother and rough father is too cliched, even back in 1999.

One the bright note, I admired the ending where Professor Porter and Jane join Tarzan in the jungle. That twist surprised and amazed me. Another positive aspect was when Tantor thought Tarzan was a piranha, and his mother had to keep reminding him, “There are no piranhas in Africa.” I just found that humorous.

Would I recommend “Tarzan”? Despite finding it just okay, the answer is still yes. The songs sung by the music crew were still fantastic. The characters were still well-developed. And the story still held up enough emotion and conflict.