art

Drawing by Hand and Coloring in Photoshop

Who’s done this before? Raise your hand. Ha ha, just playing with you. But believe it or not, it can be fun. I’ve done it so many times.

I do have a graphic tablet that I can draw on. Although I’ve gotten better control at it, I still draw better with pencil and paper—the old-fashioned way.

However, when it comes to coloring, digitally is more fun. Think about it. You’ve got unlimited colors, digital tools, and best of all, no mess to clean up. It’s all on your computer or tablet (like an iPad).

Below is an example of an illustration I did where I drew by hand and colored digitally.

Can you see the pencil lines? I don’t know about you, but I can. They look kind of rough. There are a few digitally-drawn lines as you can see on the sidewalk, street, and even the bricks. And the colors are obviously digital.

Here is another image drawn traditionally and painted digitally.

Although this might not look nearly as exciting as the one with the teenage boy above, the pencil lines are more obvious. The colors were originally done with chartpak markers, which leave extreme marks. Some hues were re-painted in Photoshop.

While these were fist done with pencil outlines, sometimes I trace the pen over the pencil and erase the pencil marks, like in this image below.

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Those lines look crisp and clear, not to mention much smoother. That is because they were done with high-quality pens. And, of course, the colors are digital.

Yes, Photoshop and any other Adobe program is costly. But if you have it or want it, once you get good at it, coloring your hand-drawn images is super fun.

Writing

I See My Many Colors Writing Through

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Yup, I enjoy handwriting in different colors. Of course, that’s only if it’s independent work, not assigned. And the first project I experimented with is my novel-in-progress.

I’ve discovered that writing my novel-in-progress in different colors actually makes a difference. It’s easier to distinguish chapters and the events that occur in them.

I also use pens instead of pencils. It keeps me from stopping to erase, dealing with graphite smudges, and fading. I do use whiteout when I make mistakes, though.

I have a pack of pens in various colors from blue to pink to brown. Some are bold, some sparkle, and some shine like metal. It’s really interesting. And no, the shining and sparkling do not distract me.

The only rule for myself is not to use light colors, such as yellow. Like everyone, I was taught this as a child. It’s hard to read, obviously. Need I say more?

I also have to deal with the running out of ink. Unfortunately, the colored pens I have run out quickly. That doesn’t stop me from keeping the multi-colored handwriting, though.

I discovered some colored pens work better than others. Of course, everybody differs. Some hold certain pens better than others. Some prefer pencils over pens. Many people favor typing over handwriting and all black or blue ink instead of different colors.

I do think writing in different colors, either by typing or by hand, is worth trying. I am glad I discovered this method worked for me. It has helped me a lot.

 

art

The Stuck Abstract Artist… No More

This is my first art post. Not only do I love to write, but I also enjoy creating artwork. I have my whole life.

I could go on and on about my art life and milestones. However, that is not what this post is about. It is about creating abstract and I method I discovered. That is picking a theme and distorting the shapes of that theme to not make it obvious. For example, one theme I’d chosen was “Cinderella.” If you look at the image below very carefully, you can see the shape of Cinderella in her ball gown.

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Cinderella is the one with the little, gray, navy, and magenta shapes and then the big navy dome below.

Another example is “Aladdin”. If you look at the pink and brown circle with the periwinkle streak on your right, that is a distorted shape of Jasmine (I used the Disney film as the theme).

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I’ve done more than Disney themes, as well. Others include Outer Space and African Jungle Safari (unrelated to “The Lion King”).

If you like to work on abstract art, and you ever get stuck, this is a great technique. If you are making money off of it or using it for school, be sure to avoid making the shapes too literal, unless your theme was not based off something copyrighted.

I used these paintings in my senior thesis at college. I did not reveal that I used subject themes to others that had helped me get through the process.

Nevertheless, I would highly recommend trying this method to anyone who has a passion for creating artwork.