cooking

Rainbow Cupcakes, Rainbow Cupcakes, I Loved You

Ooh, pretty colors. Lots of people admire bright prismatic hues, especially in desserts. I am no different. That above is a multi-colored cupcake I baked from scratch.

How did I do it? I used a vanilla chiffon cake recipe, divided the batters into different bowls, dyed them various colors, piled them up in the muffin cups, and then placed them in the oven. I added green frosting to some (not pictured) and consumed those. They were delicious!

That was…just for a few days. Unfortunately, they warmed in the container and went bad. So, I had to throw them away. Bummer! And that recipe had succeeded with me before.

Excellent vanilla cake recipes from scratch are hard to find. Not kidding. In the past, I’ve often preferred boxed cake mixes when it came to the vanilla flavor. However, I have a friend with a peanut allergy and she’s been to many of my parties. Since there aren’t a lot of nut-free bakeries in my area (there are only a few, and several minutes away from my house), when the friend with the nut allergy comes, I have to make the cakes from scratch. They’ve come out good before at every party I’ve had.

Anyway, regardless of the previous success with that recipe, if I choose to make vanilla cake or cupcakes again, I will likely find another formula to follow.

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Cake-Decorating Techniques I’m Glad I Learned

Image from Pixabay

I’ve been baking and cooking since I was 12. I’ve also learned to decorate cakes and other baked goods around that age. Of course, I struggled several times, especially in the early days.

However, I’ve been making a lot of my own occasion cakes in recent years, because one of my friends is allergic to peanuts. Unfortunately, many bakeries aren’t nut-free, including near where I live. In fact, although I reside outside New York City, allergy-friendly bakeries are rare.

Nevertheless, I still enjoy my homemade cakes and cupcakes. The interest worked out very, very well. So, without further ado, here are the techniques I am thankful for learning.

1: Crumb-coating

This is when you put a plain layer of buttercream all over the cake and put it in the refrigerator to cool. That way, you don’t end up with crumbs in your icing. That is when you put the next layer over it and you can be free to do what you want. This might not work for whipped cream frosting, though.

2: Whipped buttercream technique

You do the usual for making buttercream icing, but add extra milk (a little at a time), and whip with an electric mixer for as many as seven minutes or so. That way, your buttercream can turn out similarly to whipped cream icing. There are a few reasons it might work. One, colors tend to come out bolder in butter cream than whipped cream. Two, writing on a cake is easier with better with buttercream than whipped cream. Three, there is a special trick to whipped cream icing that keeps it from sinking into the cake. That is adding unflavored gelatin to hot water, letting it cool, and then incorporating it into the whipped cream. It’s fine, but a little more work, depending on your needs or desires.

3: Less can be more

Good cake designs don’t always have to have lots of decorations. In fact, a minimal amount can be just as beautiful, if not, more. That’s what happened when I prepared for my 26th birthday party in November 2019. I had a lot of cooking to do, so I just made simple flower-like borders around the cake’s exterior (not attached), wrote “Happy Birthday, Sunayna” with buttercream on a piece of white chocolate, and that was it. It still looked great.

So, there you have it. I hope this helps.

art

Mini Art Show: Cupcake Tower

Who has seen a cupcake tower before? I have, but only in pictures. Cupcake towers have become very popular over the years, especially at weddings.

But how many can fit on the stand all together? That’s tough when you never had one you could easily handle. Looking at pictures can only provide you so much. You can count the cupcakes you can see in the image and estimate how many are not shown. However, that’s still difficult.

It’s also hard to find exact measurements and the accurate number of cupcakes needed per base on the stand. Luckily, I found one.

Why did I do this, you may ask? Because I wanted to challenge my illustration skills. No, I am not planning a party. This was just for fun.

Enough about the stand—onto the cupcakes. I gave the cupcakes different flavors: vanilla, chocolate, red velvet, carrot, and strawberry. The frostings are vanilla, pink vanilla, chocolate, strawberry, and cream cheese. I actually made myself a cupcake library for me to copy and paste. That way, I can save time and keep the cupcakes more accurate and even.

I dragged a high number all together. I don’t recall the exact count. But who cares? Like I said before, it’s only for pleasure.

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Everything is Better Homemade, Including Cream-Filled Cupcakes

I used to like commercial-made cream-filled cupcakes. Now I don’t because they taste artificial. There are, like, so many chemicals in them. I won’t even eat Twinkies anymore because of that.

Anyway, I have baked homemade cream-filled cupcakes in the past. They didn’t turn out as well as the most recent time. That was when I went to a New Years Eve party this past winter. That is why the cupcakes say 19 or 2019.

The writing there was done with commercial icing. However, the ganache on the tops was cooked from scratch. Some of the cakes were made from scratch too. But the others came from a boxed mix. Why, you may ask? I ran out of the homemade batter. So, I bought a boxed mix.

Regardless of what I said in the title, the boxed mix kind of tasted better. Don’t worry, the filling was also created from scratch. It had marshmallow crème. That was probably a crucial ingredient for the texture.

These cupcakes turned out to be popular at the party. Not like crazy, but people enjoyed them, including myself.

Now how did I fill them? Well, technically, you’re supposed to squeeze them into the bottoms from a pastry bag. But I didn’t have that patience. So, I scooped up the tops, spooned the filling in, removed the bottom halves of the parts I pulled out, and put the tops back on. Then I frosted them with the ganache and wrote on them with the icing.

There you have it. Do you love cream-filled cupcakes? I do!

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Chocolate Cupcakes: Delicious (Yet Dry) Without Dairy

cupcakes-1452178_1920

This picture was taken from the public domain image site, Pixabay. However, it does look similar to the dairy-free chocolate cupcakes I once made (but hadn’t photographed).

I substituted almond or coconut milk for dairy. I also used oil in place of butter. All other ingredients were the same (flour, baking powder, salt, sugar, etc.).

While the cupcakes came out a bit dry, they still tasted good, especially with a dairy-free chocolate frosting. That icing called for coconut oil, dairy-free chocolate, sugar, and vanilla extract. It also tasted delicious, although it ended up being produced in large quantities. I probably should’ve reduced the recipe in half.

Nevertheless, it’s a recipe that I would love to use again. I made it because of lactose and dairy issues earlier this year. I’m mildly lactose intolerant, but can still handle dairy now.

You can still enjoy it, no matter what. To make the cupcakes more moist, try using more liquid, such as oil. Bake it at a lower temperature and check often. One trick I was taught was to set the timer for a few minutes and check. This can prevent overcooking, thus dry desserts, which not many people like. You may differ, however. No one is right or wrong with their dessert textures or preferences.