art

Drawing a Whole Room is Difficult and What You Can Do Instead

Have you ever tried to draw a room? How about a whole one? Did you struggle?

If the answer is yes to the last question or all of them, then fret not. I, too, have had trouble drawing an entire room from all angles, corners, and points-of-view. I’m sure it is possible, but probably very difficult. The Internet doesn’t offer much information about creating an entire room on paper or digitally. And if you’re not an architect, it may even be harder to execute the sketch or image you want.

However, there are other ways to make a room without having to study architectural drawings, unless, of course, you want to be an architect or already are one. Otherwise, check out the ideas below:

1: Model a room with sculpting materials

This can depend on your artistic or 3D modeling skills, both traditionally (without technology) and/or digitally. You can use inexpensive clay to build your room dimensions and designs. If you have the time, talent, and money, you can also try 3D-modeling programs.

2: Draw different angles or points-of-view as separate sketches for the room

This is what I usually do. The drawing above is not what the intention was, though. I had to observe and sketch an image for a college assignment. However, I did try this technique for other drawings that I did in my spare time for fun. I even show a couple of illustrations of a room I did on another post.

With this technique, more thinking and planning may be required. But it should be okay as well as less hectic than the 3D-modeling option.

The two techniques have their own pros and cons. Of course, it’s up to you in the end what you think will work, depending on your situations. It also wouldn’t hurt to try an approach you’ve never done before. Hope this helps.

art

At Last, I Am Back and Even Good at Art Again

After doing hardly any drawing and other forms of art, I have returned to it. While I was worried that my skills have decayed or were going away, it turned out that they remained. That’s right—I drew a picture of a boy from a photo and it came out like this:

This is just a rough, observational sketch I did of the kid. I am working on finishing it at the moment with outlining and coloring it in Photo-shop. I wanted to do it traditionally, though. By that, I mean with pen and markers. But not the generic kinds—the sophisticated types. However, I couldn’t find my fancier markers. It was probably because I am donating a portion of my art supplies.

I’m not giving up on art, though. They just took up too much space in my room. Plus, I kind of like Photo-shop better, even if it can spoil me and cause laziness.

That being said, I still enjoy non-technological media, like pens, markers, paints, and pencils, which is what I used in the drawing above. I still have the fancy pens, but I didn’t think of looking for them.

Anyway, let me get back on topic. My drawing skills remained the way they were last. So did the techniques I used in college courses, such as figure drawing. I started with the interior lines and simple shapes before refining the details. And the image still came out well.

The message I want to send to you is that not every talent you possess will deteriorate if you don’t keep up with it for a while, especially if you’ve been working on it since a young age. I’ve been doing art since my early childhood and have been using it regularly as I grew up.

Now here is the finished image of the drawing:

Writing

Cutting Notebook Paper for Writing…Not!

I am finding that when I handwrite my prose words first, they come out better on the computer. But recently, I have been handwriting what I’d write on my laptop and then dictating the words using Dragon software. Of course, I only do this at home.

One time, though, I tried ripping and cutting out paper from old, small notebooks to write my story on. While it might have worked before when I stapled the pieces together, the last time I tried, it did not work for me. I don’t know why.

So, now I am not going to do it again. What also has not usually worked for me was using full 8.5 X 11-inch paper for writing my words. But now I am writing on it using pens and then dictating the words onto my computer. Then I print out the partial chapters I have produced on Word and continue writing more of those sections by hand. The process cycles on and on. It will probably be like this till I’m done with the draft, which will hopefully be the final one. Ugh—I’ve been working on this story for almost four years. I just want to call it the end of it. Of course, there will be more books to write after this one.

Anyway, I have a lot of old notebooks, excluding those I’ve used for school or college. Sometimes, you’ve got to let those go, especially if you are attempting a process that just won’t work for you. Pushing yourself through doesn’t always succeed, either. Bottom line: do what you know you’ll keep up with, whether it’s your choice or not.